Spring Garden Tips for Truckee Meadows ~ Northern Nevada

Gathering up some gardening information for us here in Northern Nevada, especially the Truckee Meadows area. 🙂

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BIRD NOTE! 🙂 Offer birds in your area with high energy foods like peanuts and suet…as the natural food supply is at a low this time of the year. Place nesting materials in your yard. Offer fresh water.
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Annual Master Gardener Plant Fair will be held on May 19th from 7-11:30 am. Same place…over at the County Cooperative Extension 4955 Energy Way, Reno.
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Gardening in Nevada: The Bartley Ranch Series
Location: Bartley Ranch, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road, Reno.
6-8 pm

Find out how to identify and solve plant problems. Get tips on caring for your northern Nevada landscape, trees and gardens. Cosponsored by Washoe County Regional Parks and Open Space and the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. Free with no reservations required.

March 20: The Keys to Successful Vegetable Gardening
March 27: Roses for Reno

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GARDEN SHOP NURSERY

Events and Workshops held at the Garden Shop at Caughlin Ranch. This place has amazing shrubs and flowers!

The host the Impatient Gardener Radio Show.

They also have my FAVORITIST seeds ~ Botanical Interests.

Every Sunday from 10-3 they hold a Winter/Spring Farmers Market…then the summer one kicks in.

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From Rail City Garden Center

MARCH

• To control weeds this summer apply pre-emergent herbicides thru March to prevent annual weeds from germinating. Pre-emergents don’t harm anything already growing, but will prevent weeds from germinating.

• Start transplants indoors of tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant

• Prune roses when they have 3 pairs of leaves at each bud

• Check your tools and get your mower serviced and blades sharpened!

• After cleaning up flower beds apply a slow-release organic fertilizer for healthier plants this season.

• As the soil thaws, be sure to water dry areas, especially evergreens.

• Early spring is the best time for renovation & clean-up in the yard & garden. Broken & rubbing branches as well as sucker growth are easily spotted & removed at this time. Thinning overgrown shrubs by removing the oldest branches to encourage new growth is also easier before new foliage emerges.

• As new growth begins in the perennial & shrub borders, clean-up of last year’s stems is easily done. Application of Sustane fertilizer 5#/100 sq.ft. & Preen is done now (Forsythia will be in bloom) & again in late July.

• Shrubby type perennials (sub-shrubs), such as Butterfly Bushes, Blue Mist Spirea, Russian Sage & Beautyberry should be cut down now to 6-8” as these plants bloom on new wood. Ornamental grasses also need to be cut down to 6”. To make cutting grasses easier, tie a rope tight near the base of the plant & cut below it.

• Roses, Lavender & Clematis are plants that should not be pruned until new growth begins, generally in late April or May. Roses need to have dead & diseased branches removed as well as crossing stems to open up center for good air circulation. Cut lavender back to 4-6”. Summer & fall blooming clematis that bloom on new wood need to be cut down to 12”. Spring blooming varieties are best thinned & removal of dead or broken branches done.

• Spade edge borders need to be cut in spring & again mid-summer to keep grasses from encroaching into beds. Even brick borders will look sharper if edged at least once every year.

• Be sure wood mulches are top dressed early, before plants are up & in the way. Mulch should be 2-3” deep, but tapered down at trunks of trees & shrubs.

• Fall-blooming perennials as well as hostas & daylilies can be dug & divided in half or thirds (depending on size) as soon as they are up 6” to be replanted for blooms later in the season.

• Do your annual Spring Pond Clean-Out while temperatures are low. This causes less stress on the fish and gives you a chance to control algae and aquatic weeds early

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Moana Nursery have a few seminars and events lined up ~

Edible & Ornamental Herbs
Begins: Saturday, March 17, 2012 at 10:00 AM PST

Fresh herbs are good for you, good for the birds, and good for the eye. Learn where and how to incorporate them into your garden or containers and how to cook with them.

Rose Pruning Time
Begins: Saturday, March 24, 2012 at 10:00 AM PST

Master Gardener and “rose guru” Charlene Oakes will discuss when (April) and how to prune your roses and demonstrate proper techniques. She will also share other care tips for having spectacular roses, especially if you’ve never grown roses before; you’ll learn how easy they can be when the right varieties are chosen.

Good Bugs, Bad Bugs
Begins: Saturday, March 31, 2012 at 10:00 AM PST

Yes, there are good bugs and they are your garden’s friends — the trick is knowing what they do and how to identify them. You’ll also learn how to identify the bad bugs and how to control them. Join Moana Nursery’s Jim Stanton and Bonide’s John Ford for this informative seminar.

March 1st to March 15th, 2012
Moana Nursery Teammates say, “For successful highdesert gardening, NOW is the time to …

General Garden & Lawn Care:

Apply pre-emergent weed control to prevent germination of weeds and unwanted plants in your landscape.
Aerate your lawn, and if necessary, dethatch.
Feed lawn with Lawn Fertilizer.
Prevent crabgrass and feed lawn.
Rake up remaining leaves and debris, but leave a little for nesting material for the birds.
Sharpen tools and pruners – drop off at Moana Nursery by Monday and pick up late Tuesday.

Perennial & Annual Care:

Cut back, close to ground, all ornamental grasses and perennials.
Gently press back any perennials that heaved out of the ground over winter.
Plant cool-seaon flowers.
Plant summer blooming bulbs.

Herb, Fruit & Vegetable Care:

Start an edible garden.
Prune grapevine & raspberry bushes and feed.
Start warm-season annual and vegetable seeds indoors.

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The Drycreek Garden Company is offering FREE NATIVE GRASS SEED to the victims of the Washoe Fire (proof of residency is required) this Saturday, March 17th. This will be at the Old Washoe City location only from 8:30 to 11:00 am.

LIST OF SPRINGTIME FLOWERS from DRYCREEK GARDEN
SUMMERTIME FLOWERS
AUTUMN FLOWERS

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My Haul from the Annual Master Gardener Plant Sale ~ May 2009

Saturday morning I was up and out of the house by 5:45, picked up my mom and was standing in line at UNCE’s parking lot by 6:15 am. There were only 4 people in front of us…while waiting we had a great chat with one of the Master Gardener’s, Rachael. She’s been in charge of the greenhouse on Valley Road for the last six years.

Tomatoes seem to be the one thing that everyone races for…some people were down-right rude. Big sigh. But I got my ‘maters, and more, without hitting someone over the head with my box. 🙂

All my wee babies are out on the back patio hardening themselves…as they were just taken from the greenhouse on Friday. I’ll plant them by this coming Saturday, if not a bit sooner.

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Plants that I bought:

2 Homemade Pickles Cucumber
1 Spacemaster Cucumber
1 Lemon Cucumber
2 Hungarian Stuffing Peppers
1 Acorn Squash
1 Serrano Pepper
1 Delicata Squash
2 Jalapeno Peppers
2 Chamomile, German
4 Tomatillo Heirloom
1 Greek Oregano
2 Brandywine Heirloom Tomato
1 Silvery Fir Tree Heirloom Tomato
2 Red Siberian Heirloom Tomato
1 Sage
1 Parsley
1 Rosemary
1 Fennel Bronze
1 Feverfew
2 American Legion Poppy

Those will be added to the broccoli, cabbage, brussels spouts, beets, carrots, radishes, garlic, red & yellow onions, grey squash, hearts of gold cantaloupe, dill, rosemary, lemon thyme, thyme, sweet basil, oregano, Italian parsley that are already planted.

Still needed are bush bean, sweet white corn, and pumpkin seeds.

****** UPDATE: ******I forgot to add that Rachael said they get a lot of their seeds from Botanical Interests, Inc. in Colorado. They’re great seeds for our altitude here in Northern Nevada.

Time to Plan Your Garden! ~ Sparks, NV

WARNING ~ LONG POST WITH LOTS OF GARDENING LINKS AT THE END! 🙂

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Even though it’s still January and in the middle of winter…I can’t stop thinking about my garden! I’m getting itchy and twitchy! I want dirt under my nails!

In between the rains last week and the snow over the weekend there was a brief break in the skies and the sun came out. I rushed out back and busied myself with my raised garden beds. Checked the soil, threw on some leaves, newspaper and grass that was mulching in a corner and some of Starbuck’s coffee grounds. Did you know that all Starbucks have a bucket near the door that have spent coffee grounds for free?! 🙂 If you’re anywhere near UNR…the Student Union Starbucks has more then plenty.

Last year was my first garden in the raised beds we made…and there were no wormies in the soil then. I dug around and found lots of wormies in my beds. 🙂 Eat and poop my little ones!

Here are the plans for and what the raised beds looked like before I took it apart and made it smaller. PLANS FOR RAISED BEDS

The BEDS BROKEN UP INTO TWO instead of one massive bed.

And THE BEDS ALL PLANTED.

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While over at ECLECTIC CULTURE FARM I found a great site called Local Harvest ~ Real Food. Real Farmers. Real Community!

LOCAL HARVEST ~ Nevada (I linked to the Nevada part of the site…it’s country-wide though.)

Here is a little closer to home ~ NORTHERN NEVADA & EASTERN CALIFORNIA

There are lot of local farms listed where you can buy from…also a shop page to buy seeds, gifts, and whatnot.

My mouth is watering over the HEIRLOOM TOMATO SEEDS! Are those the most beautiful lip-smacking things ever?! I’m all ah-giddy!

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I’m going to start my seeds soon…last year I planted most of my seeds right into the ground. But I think I’ll start my peppers and tomatoes inside this year…I harvested a bunch of seeds before eating them. 🙂 Hatch Green Chiles and Heirloom Maters….yummmmmie!

After some doing some online research I found that you can start your seeds in almost any type of container as long as it is at least 2 to 3 inches deep and has some drainage holes.

The seeds should be started in a soilless growing mix that is made up of fine, moist and spongy blend of sphagnum moss, vermiculite and perlite. You can mix your own, using 1/3 vermiculite, 1/3 perlite, 1/3 milled sphagnum moss. This mix hardly contains any, if any, nutrients. Start feeding the seedlings with a weak fertilizer solution several weeks after they germinate…they’ll need to be fed weekly until it’s time to transplant them into the garden.

After the wee plants are 6-8 weeks old, they can be transplanted into larger pots with a coarser growing mix with up to 20% garden soil or compost…that will help the plants get ready for garden life.

Here is a cool schedule I found ~ WHEN TO START YOUR SEEDS from The Gardner’s Supply Company online site.

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MORE HELPFUL LINKS FOR NEVADA GARDNERS!

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION'S HORTICULTURE PROGRAM

THE NEVADA MASTER GARDNER PROGRAM

WASHOE COUNTY CALENDAR ~ if you live in a different county than Washoe, just click on the drop-down menu and it will let you click on your county!

A Great Link for Teachers ~ SCHOOL GARDENS PROGRAM.

HORTICULTURE PUBLICATIONS for the State of Nevada.

SEED SAVERS EXCHANGE ~ Since 1975, Seed Savers Exchange members have passed on approximately one million samples of rare garden seeds to other gardeners. They are a non-profit organization of gardeners dedicated to saving and sharing heirloom seeds.

A great write-up on THE THREE SISTERS GARDEN
~ The Three Sisters garden is a special way of growing corn, pole beans and winter squash, and its first use can be traced back to the Iroquois Confederacy.

GARDENING IN NEVADA ~ The Bartley Ranch Series. FREE CLASSES on Tuesdays starting 3 February through 31 March 2009.