2010 Garden Is FINALLY In! :)

I had to hold off on planting my garden this year due to a very cold and wet May…we were still having snow. Sheesh.

Today was 88F and very humid…29% humidity! You all in the south, just hush your mouth! That’s humid for us!

From the looks of it…most of my garden will make great Italian sauces! 🙂

In the first box I planted:

Brandywine Tomato
Black Prince – a Russian Heirloom
two types of garlic (planted last month)
Greek Oregano
Orange Bell Pepper
Sweet Basil
Flatleaf Italian Parsley

Second Box I planted:

2 Roma Tomatoes
Red Bell Pepper
German Thyme
Cayenne Pepper
Beebalm
Italian Flatleaf Parsley
2 Sweet Basils
Yellow Sweet Onions (planted 1 week ago)

In the Third Box I planted:

7 Yukon Potatoes (planted 2 weeks ago)
5 Purple Potatoes (planted 2 weeks ago)
Flatleaf Italian Parsley
2 Straightneck Squash (planted 1 week ago)

You can see the Rosemary I planted in a pot that I found in the trash the other day.

Here’s a closeup of the potatoes….

I still want to get two tomatillos, two cucumbers, one dill , and one green chile…those will go into containers.

End of the 2008 Backyard Garden ~ Next year’s Inventory

Well…I yanked the last of the tomato and pepper plants. We had a few nights where it dropped down to the freezing and my ‘maters froze.

Here’s a list of all the veggies I planted this year:

Sugar Peas
Corn
Pumpkins
Romaine
Red Leaf Lettuce
Carrots
Green Onions
Radishes
Black Beans
Bush Green Beans
Cayenne Peppers
Sweet Italian Peppers
Red Carribean Haberano Peppers
Cucumbers
Black Zucchini
Mexican Grey Squash
Yellow Crook-neck Squash
Basil
Yellow Pear Tomatoes
Cherry Tomatoes
Italian Parsley
Thyme
Rhubarb

Things I will do different next year:

Sugar Peas ~ I think I’ll pass on the peas next year. I don’t have the room to plant the amount one needs to get a good crop yield.

Tomatoes ~ No more wee tomatoes. My mom gave me two of her Heirloom tomatoes and I took the seeds out of one (then ate the tomato! Yum!). I’ll start plants from the seeds…definitely need plants in spring, not seeds.

Corn ~ Definitely more corn! It was very tasty and I didn’t plant enough this year. Excellent seed starters, do not need plants.

Onions ~ I’m going to pass on the green onions and plant yellow and red onions. Garlic too! The garlic will be planted this fall.

Radishes and Carrots ~ Yes! Excellent seed starters, do not need plants.

Squash ~ I think I’m going to just go with the Mexican Grey Squash and only two plants. I love that stuff and it grew much better than the zucchini and crook-neck. Excellent seed starters, do not need plants.

Of course Pumpkins…I’ll plant only two mounds and put them out front where they grew the best. Excellent seed starters, do not need plants.

I’ll only plant Green Beans next year and put them where I had the pumpkins in the back (that didn’t grow too well)…it’ll be a great place for them where it’ll be easy to stake them. (see picture below) Excellent seed starters, do not need plants.

More cucumber plants…this time I’ll make something for them to climb on. Excellent seed starters, do not need plants.

Yes to Cayenne Peppers and then I’ll plant New Mexican Hatch Green Chiles too. I seeded both of them and will start the seeds early so I have nice size plants to transplant in the spring…it takes too long to start them by seed in the spring.

Potatoes ~ I’m going to plant potatoes next year. I KNOW that they grow great in northern Nevada. I’d like to try Cabbage too.

I’ll move the basil out front where the parsley and thyme is. Rhubarb plants stay where they’re at. The Romaine and Red Leaf Lettuce didn’t do all that well as the squash plants over-powered them. If I plant them next year it will have to be in a place all by themselves.

Vegetable Gardening in Northern Nevada & How to make a Raised Garden

After just about killing ourselves over those bloody junipers and planting the lilac and weeping cherry, I’ve turned my sights to the back yard and making my raised vegetable beds!

In the very back of Sunset’s WESTERN LANDSCAPING BOOK, pages 404-405, in the Materials and Techniques chapter, there is a section on Building A Raised Bed.

Raising your garden above the ground can solve some of the most frustrating problems gardeners face. An easy-to-build bed makes it possible for plants to thrive where soil is poor, wildlife is hungry, or the growing season is short. And if you need easy access to your plants – due to a disability or simply to eliminate back-bending labor – you can sit on the edge of the bed and garden in comfort.
Fill the bed with the best soil you can. Good soil means that plants can be placed closer together, making a small area more productive. Line the bottom of the bed with wire screening to keep out pests, or fit it with a PVC framework for bird netting.
A raised bed can be any size, but if its more than 4 feet wide it will be difficult to reach the middle from either side. If the sides will double as benches, build the frame 18-24 inches high.

We have a small backyard ~ with a huge front and side yard. So much rearranging of the landscaping to do! OY! Here’s what I have to work with out back ~ The soil that has been turned was going to be sod…but I’ve decided to put pavers there instead. The compacted ground area behind will be where the raised garden bed will go. Behind those rocks is a an area of about two feet wide to the fence…that will be where I plant the corn.

A couple of weeks ago The State of Nevada Employees Council had an Open House at The Joe here on campus and I signed up for a lot of information from the University of Nevada's Washoe County Cooperation Extension office. I used to be in 4-H out in Washoe Valley…so I knew they were loaded with great information. I highly recommend them for all us in Northern Nevada and the Eastern California area! I posted a link to all of their free publications below.

Here are some of the pamplets I asked for:
Vegetable Varieties For Northern Nevada
A Quick Guide to Composting
Nevada Soils – Worth the Toil
Urban Forestry Tree Planting Practices for Nevada
The All Seeing, All Knowing, Lawn Care Manuel for Northern Nevada
Roses for Reno and the Northern Nevada/Eastern Sierra Area
Spring Planted Bulbs Boast Beautiful Blooms
Hardy, Drought-Tolerant and Moderately Salt-tolerant Shurbs and Vines for Northern Nevada
Seven Ways to Make Your Trees and Shurbs Drought Resistant

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS FOR FREE

The Vegetable Varieties for Northern Nevada is four pages long and gives a list of all veggie varieties that are great for planting here with the planting dates. Great comments on which are better for canning, yields, rust resistance, maturing, indoor growing, storage values, disease resistant, most popluar, etc.

ps: For all of you in the Reno/Sparks area…or those of you who will be in town on May 17th ~ at the Washoe County Extension Office on Mill Street there will be a plant sale that morning. 🙂